POSADA REAL DEL BUEN CAMINO

WHAT CAN YOU VISIT?

ZAMORA - A 16 KM

Small unknown town, bathed by the river Duero that houses in its inner area the greatest concentration of romanesque art of all Europe.

Its gastronomy will be a pleasure for your senses.
Its main highlights are its Holy Week, internationally acclaimed of tourist interest which is celebrated on March-April and its town fair and celebrations in honor of San Pedro to the last days of July.

It is lovely walking within its historic old town which evokes legends and times of capes and swords. It will also twang with the popular traditions of its nearby towns: the Toro Carnival and its bull fights, the wine harvest celebration or feeling like a pilgrim at the ‘Via de la Plata’.

Let yourself go by temptations such as wines with two certificate of origin (Tierra del Vino and Toro), the chorizo, the Fuestesauco chickpeas, the wonderful cheeses made of sheep raw milk, the Aliste veal... Without forgetting the unforgettable landscape of counties such as Sayago, Sanabria or La Carballeda.

SALAMANCA - A 50 KM

There are many reasons to visit Salamanca, a province where nature has been abundant: from the green fields of cereals to the southern snowy peaks, going through the formidable Duero canyons or the immense oak groves of Campo Charro.

In this mosaic of lands and people the traveler will be surprised by the gifts of history, such as the city of Salamanca or the engravings of Siega Verde - declared both World Heritage sites – the Vetón Territory, Historic Sets, or the Border Fortifications.

Proposals to feel that amazing province, experiences for sharing: Salamanca and its emotions await you.

ARRIBES DEL DUERO - A 50 KM

NATURE RESERVE de Las Lagunas de Villafáfila - A 50 KM

CAMINO DE SANTIAGO - VÍA DE LA PLATA

By this name it is known the Roman road that started from Emérita Augusta, capital of Lusitania and present city of Mérida and reached Asturica Augusta, nowadays Astorga. In Antonino’s Itinerary this route would be equivalent to the number XXIV between Merida and Zamora and to the number XXVI between Zamora and Astorga. It was traced during the Roman invasion in the late 1st century BC. With a purely military purpose it acquired great importance as a commercial network during the Roman Empire.

It is the great ‘Camino’ which from south to north connects the peninsula in its western part. It takes the flows of its secondary roads from Seville to Zamora, where the Andalusian roads are incorporated, as well as the ones from Levante. In Zamora region there is a double option: take the west to Orense and Santiago or continue heading north to Astorga by the so-called ‘Camino Real de la Vizana’ for having been used by the Mesta, where it joins the Camino de Santiago. The ‘Camino’ is also called "Camino Sanabrés", because it goes through Puebla de Sanabria; Or ‘Camino Meridional’, if it is observed from Galicia. The Cadiz-Sevilla stretch has recently been recovered.

ENVIRONMENTAL CRUISE - A 50 KM